Bad Debt Recovery

DEFINITION of 'Bad Debt Recovery'

A debt from a loan, credit line or accounts receivable that is recovered either in whole or in part after it has been written off or classified as a bad debt. Because it generally generates a loss when it is written off, a bad debt recovery usually produces income.

In accounting, the bad debt recovery would credit the "allowance for bad debts" or "bad debt reserve" categories, and reduce the "accounts receivable" category in the books.

BREAKING DOWN 'Bad Debt Recovery'

Not all bad debt recoveries are "like-kind" recoveries. For example, a collateralized loan that has been written off may be partially recovered through sale of the collateral. Or, a bank may receive equity in exchange for writing off a loan, which could later result in recovery of the loan and, perhaps, some additional profit.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Debt Buyer

    A company that purchases debt from creditors at a discount. Debt ...
  2. Debt Collector

    A company or agency that is in the business of recovering money ...
  3. Non-Recourse Sale

    A transaction in which a creditor turns a bad debt over to a ...
  4. Debt Cancellation Contract

    A contract in which a bank agrees to cancel all or part of a ...
  5. Bad Debt

    A debt that is not collectible and therefore worthless to the ...
  6. Charge-Off

    A term describing an expense on a company's income statement. ...
Related Articles
  1. Home & Auto

    Protecting Your Financial Documents From Disaster

    Organizing and updating your records regularly can save you a lot of grief in a time of crisis.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Unpredictable Event Or Bad Investment?

    When investments head south, your 20/20 hindsight can show you who's at fault.
  3. Economics

    Understanding Cost-Volume Profit Analysis

    Business managers use cost-volume profit analysis to gauge the profitability of their company’s products or services.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    5 Must-Have Metrics For Value Investors

    Focusing on certain fundamental metrics is the best way for value investors to cash in gains. Here are the most important metrics to know.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    5 Basic Financial Ratios And What They Reveal

    Understanding financial ratios can help investors pick strong stocks and build wealth. Here are five to know.
  6. Investing

    What Investors Need to Know About Returns in 2016

    Last year wasn’t a great one for investors seeking solid returns, so here are three things we believe all investors need to know about returns in 2016.
  7. Investing Basics

    How to Analyze a Company's Inventory

    Discover how to analyze a company's inventory by understanding different types of inventory and doing a quantitative and qualitative assessment of inventory.
  8. Professionals

    A Day In The Life Of A Public Accountant

    Here's an inside look at the workdays of two experienced CPAs, to give you an idea of what it might be like to pursue a career as a public accountant.
  9. Professionals

    A Day in the Life of a Public Accountant

    There’s no typical day in the life of a public accountant, but one accountant’s experience may shed some light on what the career entails.
  10. Economics

    The Basics Of Business Forecasting

    Whether business forecasts pertain to finances, growth, or raw materials, it’s important to remember that a forecast is little more than an informed guess.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What happens if a company doesn't think it will collect on some of its receivables?

    The accounts receivable account, or receivables for short, is created when a company extends credit to a customer based on ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is finance?

    "Finance" is a broad term that describes two related activities: the study of how money is managed and the actual process ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between positive and normative economics?

    Positive economics is objective and fact based, while normative economics is subjective and value based. Positive economic ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Can working capital be depreciated?

    Working capital as current assets cannot be depreciated the way long-term, fixed assets are. In accounting, depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Do working capital funds expire?

    While working capital funds do not expire, the working capital figure does change over time. This is because it is calculated ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How much working capital does a small business need?

    The amount of working capital a small business needs to run smoothly depends largely on the type of business, its operating ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Super Bowl Indicator

    An indicator based on the belief that a Super Bowl win for a team from the old AFL (AFC division) foretells a decline in ...
  2. Flight To Quality

    The action of investors moving their capital away from riskier investments to the safest possible investment vehicles. This ...
  3. Discouraged Worker

    A person who is eligible for employment and is able to work, but is currently unemployed and has not attempted to find employment ...
  4. Ponzimonium

    After Bernard Madoff's $65 billion Ponzi scheme was revealed, many new (smaller-scale) Ponzi schemers became exposed. Ponzimonium ...
  5. Quarterly Earnings Report

    A quarterly filing made by public companies to report their performance. Included in earnings reports are items such as net ...
Trading Center