Bad Debt Recovery

What is a 'Bad Debt Recovery'

A bad debt recovery is debt from a loan, credit line or accounts receivable that is recovered either in whole or in part after it has been written off or classified as a bad debt. Because it generally generates a loss when it is written off, a bad debt recovery usually produces income.

In accounting, the bad debt recovery would credit the "allowance for bad debts" or "bad debt reserve" categories, and reduce the "accounts receivable" category in the books.

BREAKING DOWN 'Bad Debt Recovery'

Not all bad debt recoveries are "like-kind" recoveries. For example, a collateralized loan that has been written off may be partially recovered through sale of the collateral. Or, a bank may receive equity in exchange for writing off a loan, which could later result in recovery of the loan and, perhaps, some additional profit.

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