Bailout Bond

DEFINITION of 'Bailout Bond'

A debt security issued by the Resolution Funding Corporation to bail out the savings and loan associations during the financial crisis of the late 1980s and early 1990s. The bailout bonds had zero-coupon Treasury bonds backing the principal amounts, making the instruments a safe investment.

BREAKING DOWN 'Bailout Bond'

In the mid 1990s, after the savings and loan associations recovered from its crisis, bailout bonds were no longer issued. Because the bonds were backed by Treasury securities, the yields were only marginally better than those of similar T-bonds.

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RELATED FAQS
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    Discover the various different types of debt securities, issued by government entities or corporations, that are available ... Read Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between a zero-coupon bond and a regular bond?

    The difference between a zero-coupon bond and a regular bond is that a zero-coupon bond does not pay coupons, or interest ... Read Answer >>
  4. Why are treasury bond yields important to investors of other securities?

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  5. How is the interest rate on a treasury bond determined?

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