Balance Reporting

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DEFINITION of 'Balance Reporting'

A report by a bank to a customer, normally a company or organization, informing the customer of the balances in their accounts. These real-time reports are key to the customer's cash-management program, especially for companies with far-flung operations and banking relationships in many countries.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Balance Reporting'

Balance reporting used to be done on a daily basis, but now companies can often access their current account information at any time. Customers can also now export the data for queries in other applications.

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