Baltic Tiger

DEFINITION of 'Baltic Tiger'

A colloquial term that refers to any one of the three Baltic nations of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, especially in reference to their double-digit growth rates from 2000 to 2007. The Baltic tigers achieved independence in the early 1990s, following the breakup of the Soviet Union, and embarked on an aggressive program of economic reforms and liberalization from 2000 onwards. These reforms led to significant inflows of foreign investment and resulted in these nations recording the highest growth rates in all of Europe, between 2000 and 2007.

BREAKING DOWN 'Baltic Tiger'

The Baltic Tigers share a number of attributes common to Tiger economies in other parts of the world. These attributes include an open economy, a highly-skilled workforce and relatively low wages. The credit crisis of 2008-2009 hit the Baltic Tigers especially hard, as they experienced the worst recessions among all nations worldwide, with gross domestic product contracting by 15 to 20%, in 2009.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Tiger Cub Economies

    The four Southeast Asian economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, the ...
  2. Baltic Exchange

    An exchange that handles the trading and settlement of both physical ...
  3. Baltic Dry Index - BDI

    A shipping and trade index created by the London-based Baltic ...
  4. Tiger Economy

    A nickname given to the economies of Southeast Asia. Some of ...
  5. Celtic Tiger

    A nickname for Ireland during its boom years of the late 199 ...
  6. Emerging Market Economy

    A nation's economy that is progressing toward becoming advanced, ...
Related Articles
  1. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Go International With Foreign Index Funds

    As global trade continues to expand and the world's economies grow, spice up your portfolio with these exciting opportunities.
  2. Economics

    The Baltic Dry Index: Evaluating An Economic Recovery

    This index can provide insight into economic growth and production, but it has its critics.
  3. Forex Education

    Drastic Currency Changes: What's The Cause?

    Currency fluctuations often defy logic. Learn the trends and factors that result in these movements.
  4. Taxes

    Should The U.S. Switch To A Flat Tax?

    Some countries have begun charging a flat tax rate instead of the gradual tax system of the Western world.
  5. Active Trading

    Investing Lessons From Across The Pond

    There's a lot to learn from Anthony Bolton, who is known as Europe's Peter Lynch.
  6. Personal Finance

    State-Run Economies: From Public To Private

    Find out how former Iron Curtain countries used private enterprise to join the world financial markets.
  7. Economics

    Industries That Thrive On Recession

    Recessions are not equally hard on everyone. In fact, there are some industries that even flourish amid the adversity.
  8. Stock Analysis

    6 Risks International Stocks Face in 2016

    Learn about risk factors that can influence your investment in foreign stocks and funds, and what regions are more at-risk than others.
  9. Investing

    3 Things About International Investing and Currency

    As world monetary policy continues to diverge rocking bottom on interest rates while the Fed raises them, expect currencies to continue their bumpy ride.
  10. Investing News

    Tufts Economists: TPP Will Reduce U.S. GDP

    According to economists at Tufts University, the TPP agreement will destroy half a million jobs in the U.S. by 2025.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is comparative advantage?

    Comparative advantage is an economic law that demonstrates the ways in which protectionism (mercantilism, at the time it ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does the Wall Street Journal prime rate forecast work?

    The prime rate forecast is also known as the consensus prime rate, or the average prime rate defined by the Wall Street Journal ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What's the difference between microeconomics and macroeconomics?

    Microeconomics is generally the study of individuals and business decisions, macroeconomics looks at higher up country and ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do you make working capital adjustments in transfer pricing?

    Transfer pricing refers to prices that a multinational company or group charges a second party operating in a different tax ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do mutual funds work in India?

    Mutual funds in India work in much the same way as mutual funds in the United States. Like their American counterparts, Indian ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Do mutual funds have CUSIP numbers?

    The Committee on Uniform Securities Identification Procedures (CUSIP) number is a standardized identification system used ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Flight To Quality

    The action of investors moving their capital away from riskier investments to the safest possible investment vehicles. This ...
  2. Discouraged Worker

    A person who is eligible for employment and is able to work, but is currently unemployed and has not attempted to find employment ...
  3. Ponzimonium

    After Bernard Madoff's $65 billion Ponzi scheme was revealed, many new (smaller-scale) Ponzi schemers became exposed. Ponzimonium ...
  4. Quarterly Earnings Report

    A quarterly filing made by public companies to report their performance. Included in earnings reports are items such as net ...
  5. Dark Pool Liquidity

    The trading volume created by institutional orders that are unavailable to the public. The bulk of dark pool liquidity is ...
Trading Center