Bank Administration Institute - BAI

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DEFINITION of 'Bank Administration Institute - BAI'

A non-profit organization that focuses on improving banking standards (in the operations and auditing areas) while analyzing risks and promoting productivity-enhancing technology solutions. The BAI runs professional schools, conferences and individual programs. In addition to teaching, learning and development programs, it also operates a research affiliate.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bank Administration Institute - BAI'

The BAI also functions as a networking and central resource center for those who are responsible for operations, compliance and auditing functions within the financial services industry. The organization prides itself on providing unbiased research that allows member institutions to benchmark their performance on metrics such as deposit growth, interest rate risk and other important industry parameters.

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