Bank Capital

What is 'Bank Capital'

The difference between the value of a bank's assets and its liabilities. The bank capital represents the net worth of the bank or its value to investors. The asset portion of a bank's capital includes cash, government securities and interest-earning loans like mortgages, letters of credit and inter-bank loans. The liabilities section of a bank's capital includes loan-loss reserves and any debt it owes.

BREAKING DOWN 'Bank Capital'

A bank's capital can be thought of as the margin to which creditors are covered if a bank liquidates its assets. Loan-loss reserves or loan-loss provisions, are amounts set aside by banks to allow for any loss in the value of the loans they have offered.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Allowance For Bad Debt

    A valuation account used to estimate the portion of a bank's ...
  2. Net Interest Income

    The difference between the revenue that is generated from a bank's ...
  3. Interbank Rate

    The rate of interest charged on short-term loans made between ...
  4. Business Banking

    A company's financial dealings with an institution that provides ...
  5. Appraised Equity Capital

    The excess of the market value of an asset over its book value. ...
  6. Limited Service Bank

    Any type of banking business facility that is located separately ...
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    Analyzing A Bank's Financial Statements

    A careful review of a bank's financial statements can help you identify key factors in a potential investment.
  2. Credit & Loans

    Banking Stress Tests: Would Yours Pass?

    In weaker economic times, banks may be tested by the government to see how safe they are.
  3. Investing Basics

    Retail Banking Vs. Corporate Banking

    Retail banking is the visible face of banking to the general public. Corporate banking, also known as business banking, refers to the aspect of banking that deals with corporate customers.
  4. Investing

    Why Banks Don't Need Your Money to Make Loans

    Contrary to the story told in most economics textbooks, banks don't need your money to make loans, but they do want it to make those loans more profitable.
  5. Investing Basics

    What is a Bank?

    A bank is a financial institution licensed to receive deposits or issue new securities to the public.
  6. Economics

    What is a Loan Loss Provision?

    Banks set aside loan loss provisions to cover losses from bad loans.
  7. Economics

    Explaining Risk-Weighted Assets

    Risk-weighted assets is a banking term that refers to a method of measuring the risk inherent in a bank’s assets, which is typically its loan portfolio.
  8. Stock Analysis

    Bank of America's 3 Key Financial Ratios (BAC)

    Discover some of the key financial ratios that show the quality of Bank of America's loan portfolio and how profitable the bank has been.
  9. Technical Indicators

    Key Financial Ratios to Analyze Retail Banks

    Learn about key financial metrics that investors use to evaluate retail banks, and how the industry is fundamentally different from most other industries.
  10. Savings

    Assessing Bank Assets: Are Your Savings Safe?

    Learn how to determine if your assets are safe or if your bank has spread itself too thin.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What factors are the primary drivers of banks' share prices?

    Find out which factors are most important when determining the share price of banks and other lending institutions in the ... Read Answer >>
  2. What is the average profit margin for a company in the banking sector?

    Learn what the average profit margin is for companies in the banking sector, along with other evaluation metrics often used ... Read Answer >>
  3. Are a bank's current assets counted as liquidity?

    Find out how bank assets are defined and how the Federal Reserve controls the definitions of, requirements for, and availability ... Read Answer >>
  4. What economic indicators are important to consider when investing in the banking ...

    Find out which economic indicators are most useful for investors in the banking sector, especially those influenced by central ... Read Answer >>
  5. How do leverage ratios help to regulate how much banks lend or invest?

    Learn what leverage ratios mean for banks, how regulators restrict leverage, and what impact ratios have on a bank's ability ... Read Answer >>
  6. Do banks have working capital?

    Learn the reasons why banks do not have working capital due to the lack of typical current assets and liabilities accounts, ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Physical Capital

    Physical capital is one of the three main factors of production in economic theory. It consists of manmade goods that assist ...
  2. Reverse Mortgage

    A type of mortgage in which a homeowner can borrow money against the value of his or her home. No repayment of the mortgage ...
  3. Labor Market

    The labor market refers to the supply and demand for labor, in which employees provide the supply and employers the demand. ...
  4. Demand Curve

    The demand curve is a graphical representation of the relationship between the price of a good or service and the quantity ...
  5. Goldilocks Economy

    An economy that is not so hot that it causes inflation, and not so cold that it causes a recession. This term is used to ...
  6. White Squire

    Very similar to a "white knight", but instead of purchasing a majority interest, the squire purchases a lesser interest in ...
Trading Center