Bank Fees


DEFINITION of 'Bank Fees'

Many banks charge nominal fees for various services, such as requesting a deposit slip or counter check or notarizing a document. Bank fees generally constitute a major portion of revenue for the bank, particularly for regional and local branches.


Bank fees are usually nondeductible, except for annual custodial fees charged by the bank for IRA accounts. Even checks that are used for tax records are nondeductible, unless the checks are written from a money market account with limited check-writing privileges, and violation of this privilege results in forfeiture of the account's money market status.

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