Banker's Acceptance - BA

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What is a 'Banker's Acceptance - BA'

A banker's acceptance (BA) is a short-term debt instrument issued by a firm that is guaranteed by a commercial bank. Banker's acceptances are issued by firms as part of a commercial transaction. These instruments are similar to T-Bills and are frequently used in money market funds. Banker's acceptances are traded at a discount from face value on the secondary market, which can be an advantage because the banker's acceptance does not need to be held until maturity. Banker's acceptances are regularly used financial instruments in international trade.

BREAKING DOWN 'Banker's Acceptance - BA'

Banker's acceptances vary in amount, according to the size of the commercial transaction. The date of maturity typically ranges between 30 and 180 days from the date of issue. However, banks or investors often trade the instruments on the secondary market before the acceptances reach maturity. Banker's acceptances are considered to be relatively safe investments, since the bank and the borrower are liable for the amount that is due when the instrument matures.

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