DEFINITION of 'Bank Letter Of Credit Policy'

An insurance policy that allows U.S. banks to confirm letters of credit issued by foreign financial institutions, facilitating the purchase of domestic exports. The policy was established by the Export-Import Bank of the United States and insures the domestic bank against the possible default of the foreign institution.

BREAKING DOWN 'Bank Letter Of Credit Policy'

Remember, banks take on additional risk when dealing in overseas transactions. Political risk, such as warfare or government intervention, can wipe out a borrower's ability to reimburse the bank. Furthermore, in smaller, less stable nations, foreign exchange risk can be very large. The policy protects banks against any inconvertibility arising from foreign exchange issues.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Can entities other than banks issue letters of credit?

    Obtaining a letter of credit from a non-bank is legally acceptable according to the ICC, but companies tend to prefer to ... Read Answer >>
  2. What are some examples of a Foreign Institutional Investor (FII)?

    Discover some examples of foreign institutional investors, and learn information about the nature of foreign institutional ... Read Answer >>
  3. What's the difference between a bank guarantee and a letter of credit?

    Letters of credit ensure that a transaction proceeds as planned, while bank guarantees reduce the loss if the transaction ... Read Answer >>
  4. When is it necessary to get a letter of credit?

    Capitalize on assets and negate risks by using a letter of credit. Letters of credit are often requested for buying, selling ... Read Answer >>
  5. When do I need a letter of credit?

    Learn more about the function of a letter of credit for both the buyer and the seller, and get some examples showing when ... Read Answer >>
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