DEFINITION of 'Bankmail'

An agreement made between a company planning a takeover and a bank, which prevents the bank from financing any other potential acquirer's bid.

BREAKING DOWN 'Bankmail'

Bankmail agreements are meant to stop other potential acquirers from receiving similar financing arrangements.

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