Bare Trust


DEFINITION of 'Bare Trust'

A basic trust in which the beneficiary has the absolute right to the capital and assets within the trust, as well as the income generated from these assets. Bare trusts are widely used by parents and grandparents to transfer assets to their children or grandchildren.Trust assets are held in the name of a trustee, who has the responsibility of managing the trust assets in a prudent manner so as to generate maximum benefit for the beneficiaries. The trustee has no control over these assets and has no say or discretion in directing the trust's income or capital. Also known as a simple trust.


Income generated from trust assets in the form of interest, dividends and rent is taxed in the hands of the beneficiary, making it a tax-efficient way of transferring assets to one's descendants. There is no tax implication for the individual who sets up a bare trust, since he or she gives up legal title to the assets when they are transferred to the trust.

One negative feature of a bare trust is that the beneficiaries cannot be changed once it has been set up. Another drawback is that there may be potential capital gains and inheritance tax implications in certain jurisdictions.

  1. Beneficial Interest

    The right to receive benefits on assets held by another party. ...
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  3. Trust

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  4. Beneficiary

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  5. Trustee

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  6. Inheritance Tax

    In some states in the U.S. (and in the United Kingdom), a tax ...
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  1. Can I put my IRA in a trust?

    You cannot put your IRA in a trust while you are living. You can, however, name a trust as the beneficiary of your IRA and ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does the trust maker transfer funds into a revocable trust?

    Once a revocable trust is created, a trust maker transfers funds or property into the trust by including them in a list with ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between a revocable trust and a living trust?

    A revocable trust and living trust are separate terms that describe the same thing: a trust in which the terms can be changed ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How exactly does one go about revoking a revocable trust?

    The basic steps involved in revoking a revocable trust are fairly simple, and include transfer of assets and an official ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between a revocable trust and an irrevocable trust?

    An irrevocable trust and a revocable trust are differentiated through the ability to change the trust. With an irrevocable ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is a family Limited Liability Company (LLC)?

    A family limited liability company (LLC) is formed by family members to conduct business in a state that permits such form ... Read Full Answer >>

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