Bargain Purchase

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DEFINITION of 'Bargain Purchase'

Financial assets acquired for less than fair market value. In a bargain purchase business combination, a corporate entity is acquired by another for an amount that is less than the fair market value of its net assets. Current accounting rules for business combinations require the acquirer to record the difference between fair value of the acquired net assets and the purchase price as a gain in its income statement, thereby providing an immediate boost to the acquirer's equity.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bargain Purchase'

In the aftermath of the 2008 market crash, the enormous number of financial companies that were trading at huge discounts to their book value presented an unmatched opportunity for bargain purchases. Firms that were able to take advantage of these distressed priced companies and assets were able to add to their asset base at relatively little cost. However, only a limited number of financial companies were acquired in this manner.

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