Barings Bank

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DEFINITION of 'Barings Bank'

A British merchant bank that was started in 1762, and for centuries was considered the largest and most stable bank in the world. In 1995, Barings - then the oldest bank in Britain - collapsed after it was unable to meet its cash requirements following unauthorized speculative trading in derivatives at its Singapore office by then-trader Nick Leeson.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Barings Bank'

Leeson, acting as a rogue trader, accumulated well over $1 billion in losses, which eventually led to the bank's collapse. Barings Bank was purchased by ING for £1.00 shortly after it was determined that the bank did not have enough capital on hand to cover its debts.

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