Base II

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DEFINITION of 'Base II'

A data processing network operated by Visa USA for the clearing and settlement of bank card transactions between card-honoring merchant banks and card issuers. This system provides net daily account settlement among Visa member institutions. The other data processing network by VISA, Base I, authorizes transactions, while the Base II clears and settles the transactions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Base II'

Base II was created along with the Base I standard in 1976 by Bank of America's IT staff. BASE stands for Bank of America System Engineering. The system was so named because prior to 1973, VISA was known as BankAmericard.

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