Base II

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Base II'

A data processing network operated by Visa USA for the clearing and settlement of bank card transactions between card-honoring merchant banks and card issuers. This system provides net daily account settlement among Visa member institutions. The other data processing network by VISA, Base I, authorizes transactions, while the Base II clears and settles the transactions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Base II'

Base II was created along with the Base I standard in 1976 by Bank of America's IT staff. BASE stands for Bank of America System Engineering. The system was so named because prior to 1973, VISA was known as BankAmericard.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Group Of 30 - G30

    A consultive group composed of academics and financiers whose ...
  2. Base I

    The data processing network used by Visa USA to process and provide ...
  3. Credit Card

    A card issued by a financial company giving the holder an option ...
  4. Charge Card

    A card that charges no interest but requires the user to pay ...
  5. Credit

    1. A contractual agreement in which a borrower receives something ...
  6. Bank

    A financial institution licensed as a receiver of deposits. There ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How is minimum transfer price calculated?

    A company that transfers goods between multiple divisions needs to establish a transfer price so that each division can track ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the effective interest method of amortization?

    The effective interest method is an accounting practice used for discounting a bond. This method is used for bonds sold at ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What does an unfavorable variance indicate to management?

    In managerial accounting, an unfavorable variance is discovered when a company's management performs a comparison between ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Is there a way to include intangible assets in book-to-market ratio calculations?

    The book-to-market ratio is used in fundamental analysis to identify whether a company's securities are overvalued or undervalued. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are some of the limitations and drawbacks of using a payback period for analysis?

    Limitations, or disadvantages, of using the payback period method in capital budgeting include the fact that it fails to ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between "closed end credit" and a "line of credit?"

    Depending on the need, an individual or business may take out a form of credit that is either open- or closed-ended. While ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Credit & Loans

    How Credit Cards Affect Your Credit Rating

    The average American household has four cards, but does that mean more is better?
  2. Retirement

    Understanding Credit Card Interest

    Paying these rates can impact your disposable income and your investment returns.
  3. Credit & Loans

    How Credit Cards Built A Plastic Empire

    A decade before Mastercard or Visa existed, the first credit card company was introduced.
  4. Investing Basics

    Calculating Unlevered Free Cash Flow

    Unlevered free cash flow (UFCF) is the free cash flow of a business before interest payments.
  5. Taxes

    Understanding Write-Offs

    Write-off has different meanings depending on the context in which it is used, but generally refers to a reduction in value due to expense or loss.
  6. Economics

    What are Capital Goods?

    Capital goods are assets with a useful life of more than one year that are used for the production of income.
  7. Economics

    Understanding Capital Assets

    A capital asset is one that a company plans on owning for more than one year, and uses in the production of revenue.
  8. Credit & Loans

    American Express Cards: Centurion Vs. Platinum

    If you're offered a coveted black card from AmEx, should you accept it?
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    What is Year-to-Date?

    Year-to-date (YTD) is a term that describes financial results from the beginning of the current year up to the day the financial number is reported.
  10. Economics

    What is Managerial Accounting?

    Managerial accounting is internally-based accounting that helps managers measure the results of their decisions.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  2. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
  3. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
  4. Current Account Deficit

    A measurement of a country’s trade in which the value of goods and services it imports exceeds the value of goods and services ...
  5. International Monetary Fund - IMF

    An international organization created for the purpose of: 1. Promoting global monetary and exchange stability. 2. Facilitating ...
  6. Risk-Return Tradeoff

    The principle that potential return rises with an increase in risk. Low levels of uncertainty (low-risk) are associated with ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!