Base Year

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Base Year'

The first of a series of years in an economic or financial index. A base year is normally set to an arbitrary level of 100. Any year can be chosen as a base year, but typically recent years are chosen. New, more up-to-date base years are periodically introduced to keep data current in a particular index.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Base Year'

A base year is the year used for comparison for the level of a particular economic index. The arbitrary level of 100 is selected so that percentage changes (either rising or falling) can be easily depicted. For example, to find that rate of inflation (or any other economic index) between 2005 and 2010, one would make calculations using 2005 as the base year, or the first year in the time set.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Base-Year Analysis

    1. The analysis of economic trends in relation to a specific ...
  2. Index

    A statistical measure of change in an economy or a securities ...
  3. Base Period

    A particular time period for which data is gathered and used ...
  4. Economics

    A social science that studies how individuals, governments, firms ...
  5. Year Over Year - YOY

    A method of evaluating two or more measured events to compare ...
  6. Endowment Effect

    The endowment effect describes a circumstance in which an individual ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What's the difference between the coverage ratio and the levered free cash flow to ...

    Coverage ratios focus on a company’s ability to manage its debt, while the levered free cash flow to enterprise value ratio ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between a simple random sample and a stratified random sample?

    Simple random samples and stratified random samples differ in how the sample is drawn from the overall population of data. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What causes politicians or governments to begin "pork barrel" spending?

    Pork barrel spending occurs when the government taxes the general population to hand out concentrated benefits to special ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do markets account for systematic risk?

    Systematic risks provide markets with an unpleasant quandary. Economists, policy makers, directors, fund managers and investors ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are some ways a company can improve on its Return on Capital Employed (ROCE)?

    Options available to a company seeking to improve on its return on capital employed (ROCE) ratio include reducing costs, ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. When can I use the Dividend Discount Method (DDM) to value a stock?

    Investors can use the dividend discount model (DDM) for stocks that have just been issued or that have traded on the secondary ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    Understanding The Consumer Confidence Index

    We look at this closely watched economic indicator to see what it means and how it's calculated.
  2. Investing Basics

    Economic Indicators That Do-It-Yourself Investors Should Know

    Understanding these investing tools will put the market in your hands.
  3. Economics

    Why The Consumer Price Index Is Controversial

    Find out why economists are torn about how to calculate inflation.
  4. Retirement

    Economic Indicators To Know

    The economy has a large impact on the market. Learn how to interpret the most important reports.
  5. Economics

    Will The US Economy Rebound In The 2nd Quarter?

    Most investors know that U.S. 1st quarter growth numbers aren’t pretty. Economic statistics have been missing expectations by the largest margin since 2009
  6. Economics

    Explaining the EBITDA Margin

    EBITDA margin can provide an investor with a cleaner view of a company's core profitability.
  7. Economics

    What Part of the Money Supply is M2?

    M2 is the part of the money supply economists use to analyze and predict inflation.
  8. Economics

    The U.S. Economy May Be Stronger Than You Think

    While the economic performance in the U.S. broadly disappointed in the first quarter, temporary factors presented one-off events that depressed output.
  9. Economics

    Understanding Marginal Benefit

    Marginal benefit is an economic term that describes the maximum amount a consumer is willing to pay for an additional unit of a good or service.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Understanding the Simple Random Sample

    A simple random sample is a subset of a statistical population in which each member of the subset has an equal probability of being chosen.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  2. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  3. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  4. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
  5. Adverse Selection

    1. The tendency of those in dangerous jobs or high risk lifestyles to get life insurance. 2. A situation where sellers have ...
Trading Center