Batting Average

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DEFINITION of 'Batting Average'

A statistical measure used to measure an investment manager's ability to meet or beat an index. Batting average is calculated by dividing the number of days (or months, quarters, etc.) in which the manager beats or matches the index by the total number of days (or months, quarters, etc.) in the period of question and multiplying that factor by 100.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Batting Average'

An investment manager who outperforms the market in 15 out of a possible 30 days would have a statistical batting average of 50. The longer the time period taken in the sample size, the more statistically significant the measure becomes. Many analysts use this simple calculation in their broader assessments of individual investment managers.

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