Benefit Cost Ratio - BCR

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DEFINITION of 'Benefit Cost Ratio - BCR'

A ratio attempting to identify the relationship between the cost and benefits of a proposed project. Benefit cost ratios are most often used in corporate finance to detail the relationship between possible benefits and costs, both quantitative and qualitative, of undertaking new projects or replacing old ones.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Benefit Cost Ratio - BCR'

As mentioned, the ratio is used to measure both quantitative and qualitative factors, since sometimes benefits and costs cannot be measured exclusively in financial terms. In cases where at all possible however, qualitative factors should be translated to quantitative terms in order for the results to be easily understandable and tangible.

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