Barrels Per Day - B/D

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DEFINITION of 'Barrels Per Day - B/D'

A measure of oil output, represented by the number of barrels of oil produced in a single day. For example, you might hear "country ABC has the potential to produce five million barrels per day". The abbreviation "bbl/d" can also be used to represent this production measure.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Barrels Per Day - B/D'

The barrels-per-day measure is commonly used in the oil spot markets, as prices are usually quoted in terms of dollars per barrel. One barrel of oil contains approximately 42 U.S. gallons, or 35 imperial gallons, and weighs approximately 0.134 tons.

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