Business Development Company - BDC

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DEFINITION of 'Business Development Company - BDC'

A company that is created to help grow small companies in the initial stages of their development. BDCs are very similar to venture capital funds. Many BDCs are set up much like closed-end investment funds and are actually public companies that are listed on the NYSE, AMEX and Nasdaq.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Business Development Company - BDC'

To qualify as a BDC, companies must be registered in compliance with Section 54 of the Investment Company Act of 1940. A major difference between a BDC and a venture capital fund is that BDCs allow smaller, non-accredited investors to invest in startup companies. Some of the reasons why BDCs have become popular is that they provide permanent capital to their management, allow investments by the general public and use mezzanine financing opportunities.

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