Beep

DEFINITION of 'Beep'

Financial industry jargon for "basis point." The term came into popular usage as an easier way of referring to the basis points' "BPS" acronym. It is sometimes also pronounced "bips".

BREAKING DOWN 'Beep'

A basis point is 1/100 of a percentage point in the context of interest rates and bond yields. For example, an interest rate increase of 0.25 percentage point by the Federal Reserve would be generally referred to as an increase of 25 basis points, and by financial industry insiders as an increase of 25 beeps.

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