Behavioral Accounting

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DEFINITION of 'Behavioral Accounting'

An accounting method which takes into account key decision makers as part of the value of a company. Behavioral accounting was developed to make the behavioral effects transparent to potential and current stakeholders. This is done to better understand the impact that business processes, opinions, and human variables have on the value of the overall corporation, now and in the future.

Also known as "human resource accounting".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Behavioral Accounting'

In behavioral accounting the valuation of a company goes beyond the numbers and attempts to include the human factor.

Take the example of two companies, company ABC and DEF, which have identical financial statements. If ABC has a more experienced workforce, and stronger management than DEF then ABC should be worth more. Behavioral accounting attempts to measure and record this aspect of a business. Behavioral accounting is of particular interest to scholars due to the influence of time constraints, accountability, judgments, and motivations individual decision makers have.

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