Ben Bernanke

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Ben Bernanke'

The chairman of the board of governors of the U.S. Federal Reserve. Bernanke took over the helm from Alan Greenspan on February 1, 2006, ending Greenspan's 18-year leadership at the Fed. A former Fed governor, Bernanke was chairman of the U.S. President's Council of Economic Advisors prior to being nominated as Greenspan's successor in late 2005.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Ben Bernanke'

Born Ben Shalom Bernanke on December 13, 1953, he was the son of a pharmacist and a schoolteacher and was raised in the Southeastern United States. A high-achieving student, Bernanke completed his undergraduate degree summa cum laude at Harvard University, then went on to complete his Ph.D. at MIT in 1979. He taught economics at Stanford and then Princeton University until 2002, when he left his academic work for public service.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Federal Reserve Bank

    The central bank of the United States and the most powerful financial ...
  2. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds ...
  3. Congressional Oversight Panel - ...

    A panel created by the U.S. Congress in 2008 to oversee for the ...
  4. Green Shoots

    A term used to describe signs of economic recovery or positive ...
  5. Alan Greenspan

    The former chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal ...
  6. Federal Open Market Committee - ...

    The branch of the Federal Reserve Board that determines the direction ...
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    Alan Greenspan: 19 Years In The Federal Reserve

    Follow the economic glories and bumbles in the career of the previous Fed chair.
  2. Personal Finance

    How The U.S. Government Formulates Monetary Policy

    Learn about the tools the Fed uses to influence interest rates and general economic conditions.
  3. Active Trading Fundamentals

    Brains Don't Always Bring The Bucks

    Common mistakes can prevent even the smartest investors from beating the market.
  4. Economics

    In what instances is quantitative easing used?

    Discover when, how and why the Federal Reserve and other central banks turn to quantitative easing to stimulate economic activity.
  5. Economics

    How does the Federal Reserve determine the discount rate?

    Learn about the several different kind of discount rates offered to banks and other depository institutions through the Federal Reserve's discount window.
  6. Economics

    What is the difference between fiscal policy and monetary policy?

    Utilizing founding principles of macroeconomics through both fiscal and monetary policy can have drastic effects on a country's economic state.
  7. Investing

    Reassessing Your Approach To Bond Investing

    Rethinking your fixed-income portfolio may not resonate in quite the same way as dropping 10 pounds or finally giving up that smoking habit.
  8. Bonds & Fixed Income

    How are treasury bill interest rates determined?

    Find out why interest rates for U.S. Treasury bills are determined at auction and how so-called "competitive" bidders impact returns on these debt securities.
  9. Bonds & Fixed Income

    How do treasury bill prices affect other investments?

    Find out how the price and yield of Treasury bills can impact the level of risk investors are willing to accept in their securities.
  10. Bonds & Fixed Income

    How does quantitative easing in the U.S. affect the bond market?

    See why it is very difficult to evaluate the impact of the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing, or QE, program on bond prices and yields.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Prospectus

    A formal legal document, which is required by and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, that provides details ...
  2. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest ...
  3. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  4. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  5. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  6. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
Trading Center