Benefit Period

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DEFINITION of 'Benefit Period'

The benefit period is the length of time during which a benefit is paid. This can involve a government benefit program such as Medicare, or payment from an insurance policy, such as health or disability insurance. The benefit period is defined in each program or policy's guidelines.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Benefit Period'

The benefit period can vary from policy to policy. For example, the benefit period in the context of Medicare begins the day an insured is admitted to a hospital or skilled nursing facility (SNF), and ends when the insured has not received any care for 60 days in a row.




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