Better Business Bureau - BBB

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DEFINITION of 'Better Business Bureau - BBB'

The Better Business Bureau (BBB) aims to promote ethical business practices, leading to an environment where buyers and sellers can operate under a common understanding of trust. Through encouraging better practices on the part of the consumer and the business and setting proper marketplace standards, the BBB provides educational material regarding general and specific desirable business practices. Firms that adhere to the mandated guidelines can attain BBB accredited businesses status.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Better Business Bureau - BBB'

Consumers can file a complaint about a business if they feel that they have not been treated fairly. Historically, the BBB successfully resolves 70% of filed complaints. This organization serves to create a more trusting relationship between businesses and consumers.

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