Bank Investment Contract - BIC

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DEFINITION of 'Bank Investment Contract - BIC'

A security or portfolio of securities that offers a guaranteed rate of return. As the name implies, the guaranteed rate in a Bank Investment Contract is ensured by the bank for a predetermined length of time, usually one to 10 years. A bank investment contract (BIC) is typically a low-risk, low-yield investment suited to those looking to preserve rather than grow their wealth.


Sometimes called a bank deposit agreement.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bank Investment Contract - BIC'

BICs are similar to guaranteed investment contracts (GICs), which are issued by insurance companies. The primary disadvantage of all such contracts is that they are very illiquid, given that they generally require the money invested to stay put for the length of the contract. On the plus side, unlike certificates of deposit (CDs), BICs allow one to invest incrementally and when subsequent deposits are allowed, they receive the guaranteed rate as well.

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