Bid Size


DEFINITION of 'Bid Size'

The number of shares being offered for purchase at a specified bid price, that a buyer is willing to purchase at that bid price. For example, if an investor wants to buy 200 shares of Company ABC at $10 per share, the bid size is 200 shares. A stock exchange would then quote this bid size in the hundreds, so the bid size for Company ABC would be two. If the bid size was 500 shares, the bid size quote would be five.


Bid size is the opposite of ask size. Ask size is the amount of a security that a company is offering to sale. Bid size and ask size are thought to have a relationship which imply that if bid sizes are higher than ask sizes, then there may be a high demand for the stock.

  1. Proportional Spread

    A measure of a security's liquidity that is calculated by comparing ...
  2. Ask Size

    The amount of a security that a market maker is offering to sell ...
  3. Current Price

    The "real time" price of a security trading on an exchange, as ...
  4. Bid Price

    The price a buyer is willing to pay for a security. This is one ...
  5. Bid

    1. An offer made by an investor, a trader or a dealer to buy ...
  6. Bid-Ask Spread

    The amount by which the ask price exceeds the bid. This is essentially ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    The Basics Of The Bid-Ask Spread

    The bid-ask spread is essentially a negotiation in progress. To be successful, traders must be willing to take a stand and walk away in the bid-ask process through limit orders.
  2. Active Trading

    Introduction To Level II Quotes

    Find out what's happening in a given stock with this service showing Nasdaq market makers' best bid and ask prices.
  3. Brokers

    The Next Industries Bound to be Uberized

    As more startups succeed with the sharing economy business model, investors seek out businesses poised to disrupt their industries like Uber.
  4. Budgeting

    When Using a Money Order Makes Sense

    Money orders are usually the least expensive way to send "cleared" funds to pay a bill (or traffic ticket). Here's how they work and what to watch out for.
  5. Options & Futures

    Terrorism's Effects on Wall Street

    Terrorist activity tends to have a negative impact on the markets, but just how much? Find out how to take cover.
  6. Brokers

    How Real Estate Agent and Broker Fees Work

    Buying or selling a home? What you need to know about real estate agent and broker fees.
  7. Professionals

    The Role of a Prime Broker

    Understand the role of a prime brokerage, and learn about the services investment banks provide for hedge funds while in the role of being a prime broker.
  8. Investing Basics

    Understand How the Stock Market Works

    Learn what it means to own stocks and shares, why shares exist, and how you buy and sell them.
  9. Brokers

    How RIAs and Independent Broker-Dealers Differ

    There are many types of financial planners. Here we break down what sets RIAs apart from independent broker-dealers.
  10. Professionals

    The Pros and Cons of a Hybrid Advisor Practice

    Deciding whether or not operating as a hybrid makes sense for your practice? Consider the following first.
  1. Why are the bid prices of T-bills higher than the ask prices? Aren't bids supposed ...

    Yes, you are correct that the ask price of a security should typically be higher than the bid price. This is because people ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What do the "BxA" numbers on my brokerage's trading screen mean?

    The letters 'B' and 'A' in the notation BxA refer to bid and ask, respectively. When you look at online stock quote data, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How long does a stock account have to be dormant before it can be escheated?

    A stock account is typically considered dormant and eligible for escheatment after five years of inactivity; however, this ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why would a corporation issue convertible bonds?

    A convertible bond represents a hybrid security that has bond and equity features; this type of bond allows the conversion ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the interest rate offered on a typical margin account?

    Interest rates on margin accounts vary according to the size of the loan and the brokerage firm being used. Generally, interest ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between shares outstanding and floating stock?

    Shares outstanding and floating stock are different measures of the shares of a particular stock. Shares outstanding is the ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Barefoot Pilgrim

    A slang term for an unsophisticated investor who loses all of his or her wealth by trading equities in the stock market. ...
  2. Quick Ratio

    The quick ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. The quick ratio measures a company’s ability to meet ...
  3. Black Tuesday

    October 29, 1929, when the DJIA fell 12% - one of the largest one-day drops in stock market history. More than 16 million ...
  4. Black Monday

    October 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) lost almost 22% in a single day. That event marked the beginning ...
  5. Monetary Policy

    Monetary policy is the actions of a central bank, currency board or other regulatory committee that determine the size and ...
  6. Indemnity

    Indemnity is compensation for damages or loss. Indemnity in the legal sense may also refer to an exemption from liability ...
Trading Center