Bid Size

DEFINITION of 'Bid Size'

The number of shares being offered for purchase at a specified bid price, that a buyer is willing to purchase at that bid price. For example, if an investor wants to buy 200 shares of Company ABC at $10 per share, the bid size is 200 shares. A stock exchange would then quote this bid size in the hundreds, so the bid size for Company ABC would be two. If the bid size was 500 shares, the bid size quote would be five.

 

BREAKING DOWN 'Bid Size'

Bid size is the opposite of ask size. Ask size is the amount of a security that a company is offering to sale. Bid size and ask size are thought to have a relationship which imply that if bid sizes are higher than ask sizes, then there may be a high demand for the stock.
 

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RELATED FAQS
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