Big Ben

DEFINITION of 'Big Ben'

An investing slang term referencing Ben Bernanke. The name Big Ben was given to Bernanke around 2005, when he was appointed to the position of Federal Reserve chairman by President George Bush.
The name Big Ben is often used in headlines due to its relative compactness. Analysts also use the slang term, which has no relation to the landmark in London.

BREAKING DOWN 'Big Ben'

Bernanke took over the chairman position from Alan Greenspan on February 1, 2006. Before taking over the position, Ben was the Fed governor and chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers.

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