Big Ticket Item

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DEFINITION of 'Big Ticket Item'

Big ticket items are high-value items, such as houses and cars, as well as expensive products such as appliances, home theater systems and furniture. In the context of retail stores, they may also refer to products with selling price and profit margins that are significantly higher than those of other items in the stores. In economics, big ticket items can also sometimes be called durable goods, which is a good that lasts a relatively long time and provides utility to the user.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Big Ticket Item'

There is no accepted dollar threshold level that defines a big ticket item. As well, a big ticket item need not necessarily be a luxury product or one purchased with discretionary income, since many products that typically fall within this category - for example, refrigerators and washing machines - are considered necessities rather than luxury items. Looking at the level of sales of big ticket items or durable goods can be an indicator of the performance of the economy and consumer confidence.

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