Big Bang

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DEFINITION of 'Big Bang'

The day of deregulation for the securities market in London, England on October 27, 1986, in which the London Stock Exchange (LSE) became a private limited company. The event revitalized the LSE because outside corporations were allowed to enter its member firms and automated price quotation was established.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Big Bang'

Before Big Bang, the LSE was trailing the other major exchanges in the world. At the time, the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) was listed as the No.1 market worldwide, determined by turnover rate. London was only able to turn over one-thirteenth of the volume transacted by the NYSE. The electronic trading system helped improve London's turnover because orders were now accepted by telephone and computer.

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