Big Four (or Big Five, Big Six, Big Eight)

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DEFINITION of 'Big Four (or Big Five, Big Six, Big Eight)'

The largest accounting firms in the United States as measured by revenue.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Big Four (or Big Five, Big Six, Big Eight)'

Most of the auditing for public companies is done by these firms. This term is constantly changing largely due to mergers. At one point the grouping was called the Big Eight, then Big Six, Big Five, etc.

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