Bill Presentment

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DEFINITION

The submission of a bill of exchange for payment. A bill, such as a bank check, is an instrument directs a third party to pay the recipient the fixed sum, while presentment refers to the act of submitting a legal document to another party.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Electronic bill presentment and payment (EBPP) is a process that allows bills to be created, processed and paid over the internet. Most large banks will offer these bill payment services and some form of EBPP as a part of their online banking system.


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