Bioeconomics

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Bioeconomics'

A progressive branch of social science that seeks to integrate the disciplines of economics and biology for the sole purpose of creating theories that do a better job of explaining economic events using a biological basis and vice versa. The proponents of bioeconomics believe that the same patterns that can be seen in biological evolution can be applied to stock market behavior, as many of the same "causal interactions" and "survival elements" can be found there as well as in nature.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bioeconomics'

In nature, we see groups of different organisms working together to best utilize the resources needed to sustain life, while still promoting a "survival of the fittest" framework. Like behavioral finance and other applied economic schools, bioeconomics is another example of economic theory branching out of classical boundaries and attempting to better explain the complex economies of today.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Dismal Science

    A term coined by Scottish writer, essayist and historian Thomas ...
  2. Behavioral Finance

    A field of finance that proposes psychology-based theories to ...
  3. Game Theory

    A model of optimality taking into consideration not only benefits ...
  4. Economics

    A social science that studies how individuals, governments, firms ...
  5. Horizontal Merger

    A merger occurring between companies in the same industry. Horizontal ...
  6. Head-Fake Trade

    A trade where a stock or market appears to be making a move in ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is price variance in cost accounting?

    Price variance in cost accounting is the difference between the actual price paid by a company to purchase an item and its ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What do you need to know to create a business model?

    A business model lays out the idea for a business, along with the step-by-step plan for making the business profitable. To ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do any markets not exhibit asymmetric information?

    Asymmetric information, when interpreted literally, means that two parties to an economic transaction have different information ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the benefits of using ceteris paribus assumptions in economics?

    Most, though not all, economists rely on ceteris paribus conditions to build and test economic models. The reason they do ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between marginal benefit and marginal revenue?

    Marginal benefit measures the consumer's benefit of consuming an additional unit of a good or service, while marginal revenue ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between marginal benefit and marginal cost?

    Marginal benefit is the incremental increase in a benefit to a consumer caused by the consumption of an additional unit of ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    Economics Basics

    Learn economics principles such as the relationship of supply and demand, elasticity, utility, and more!
  2. Economics

    The Uncertainty Of Economics: Exploring The Dismal Science

    Learning about the study of economics can help you understand why you face contradictions in the market.
  3. Trading Strategies

    How To Cover Your Bases After Making A Trade

    Follow up your trade entry with these time-tested risk management strategies.
  4. Chart Advisor

    Commodity Traders are Watching These 3 Charts

    As we head towards the summer months, many commodity traders are looking to diversify their holdings and to protect themselves against inflation.
  5. Economics

    The Big Chill: What’s Wrong With The U.S. Consumer

    Based on the most recent April data, investors may, once again, be disappointed when the second-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) report comes in.
  6. Economics

    Explaining Tier 1 Capital

    Tier 1 capital refers to the core capital a bank must maintain in relation to its assets.
  7. Personal Finance

    Can Electric Cars Replace Gas Guzzlers?

    High costs and poor battery performance have deterred many from switching to electric cars, which begs the question: can electric cars replace gas guzzlers?
  8. Trading Strategies

    Micro-Patterns: Looking At The Smaller Picture

    Micro-patterns within trading ranges reveal hidden characteristics of the bull-bear struggle.
  9. Economics

    Explaining Business Risk

    Business risk is the risk associated with the overall operations of a business entity.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    How to Calculate a Combined Ratio

    Combined ratio is a formula used in the insurance industry to measure the performance of an insurance company.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  2. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
  3. Variance

    The spread between numbers in a data set, measuring Variance is calculated by taking the differences between each number ...
  4. Terminal Value - TV

    The value of a bond at maturity, or of an asset at a specified, future valuation date, taking into account factors such as ...
  5. Rule Of 70

    A way to estimate the number of years it takes for a certain variable to double. The rule of 70 states that in order to estimate ...
  6. Risk Premium

    The return in excess of the risk-free rate of return that an investment is expected to yield. An asset's risk premium is ...
Trading Center