Bioeconomics

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Bioeconomics'

A progressive branch of social science that seeks to integrate the disciplines of economics and biology for the sole purpose of creating theories that do a better job of explaining economic events using a biological basis and vice versa. The proponents of bioeconomics believe that the same patterns that can be seen in biological evolution can be applied to stock market behavior, as many of the same "causal interactions" and "survival elements" can be found there as well as in nature.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bioeconomics'

In nature, we see groups of different organisms working together to best utilize the resources needed to sustain life, while still promoting a "survival of the fittest" framework. Like behavioral finance and other applied economic schools, bioeconomics is another example of economic theory branching out of classical boundaries and attempting to better explain the complex economies of today.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Dismal Science

    A term coined by Scottish writer, essayist and historian Thomas ...
  2. Game Theory

    A model of optimality taking into consideration not only benefits ...
  3. Behavioral Finance

    A field of finance that proposes psychology-based theories to ...
  4. Economics

    A social science that studies how individuals, governments, firms ...
  5. Marginal Rate of Technical Substitution

    The rate at which one factor has to be decreased in order to ...
  6. Absolute Advantage

    The ability of a country, individual, company or region to produce ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the different types of price discrimination and how are they used?

    Price discrimination is one of the competitive practices used by larger, established businesses in an attempt to profit from ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the different sources of business risk?

    A certain risk level is inherent in running a business. A company cannot completely eliminate risk, but it can control or ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does the law of diminishing returns affect marginal revenue?

    The law of diminishing returns is better thought of as the law of increasing opportunity costs. The law states that -- if ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the theory of asymmetric information in economics?

    The theory of asymmetric information was developed in the 1970s and 1980s as a plausible explanation for common phenomena ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do command economies control surplus production and unemployment rates?

    Historically, command economies don't have the luxury of surplus production; chronic shortages are the norm. They have also ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How is marginal analysis used in making a managerial decision?

    Marginal analysis plays a crucial role in managerial economics, the study and application of economic concepts, to managerial ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    Economics Basics

    Learn economics principles such as the relationship of supply and demand, elasticity, utility, and more!
  2. Economics

    The Uncertainty Of Economics: Exploring The Dismal Science

    Learning about the study of economics can help you understand why you face contradictions in the market.
  3. Economics

    What Is Supply?

    Supply is the amount of goods a producer is willing to produce at a given price, and is one of the most basic concepts in economics.
  4. Economics

    What is a Management Buyout?

    A management buyout, or MBO, is a transaction where a company's management team purchases the assets and operations of the business they manage.
  5. Economics

    Modified Internal Rate of Return (MIRR)

    Modified internal rate of return (MIRR) is a variant of the more traditional internal rate of return calculation.
  6. Economics

    Explaining Cash On Delivery

    Cash on delivery, also referred to as COD, is a method of shipping goods to buyers who do not have credit terms with the seller.
  7. Credit & Loans

    What's a Revolving Line of Credit?

    A revolving line of credit is an arrangement made between a company or an individual and a bank to borrow money on a short-term basis.
  8. Economics

    Understanding Horizontal Integration

    Horizontal integration is the acquisition or internal creation of related businesses to a company’s current business focus.
  9. Economics

    Understanding Marginal Benefit

    Marginal benefit is an economic term that describes the maximum amount a consumer is willing to pay for an additional unit of a good or service.
  10. Personal Finance

    Will Tesla Cars Ever Be Affordable?

    Tesla cars are highly sought after, but also command a very high price tag.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fiduciary

    1. A person legally appointed and authorized to hold assets in trust for another person. The fiduciary manages the assets ...
  2. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  3. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  4. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  5. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
Trading Center