DEFINITION of 'Bank For International Settlements - BIS'

An international organization fostering the cooperation of central banks and international monetary policy makers. Established in 1930, it is the oldest international financial organization, and was created to administer the transaction of monies according to the Treaty of Versailles. Among others, its main goals are to promote information sharing and to be a key center for economic research.

BREAKING DOWN 'Bank For International Settlements - BIS'

Essentially, the BIS is a central bank for central banks; it does not provide financial services to individuals or corporations. The BIS is located in Basel, Switzerland, and has representative offices in Mexico City and Hong Kong. Member banks include the Bank of Canada, the Federal Reserve Bank and the European Central Bank.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Central Bank

    The entity responsible for overseeing the monetary system for ...
  2. National Bank

    In the United States, a commercial bank chartered by the comptroller ...
  3. International Reserves

    Any kind of reserve funds that can be passed between the central ...
  4. IRS Publication 901

    A document published by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) that ...
  5. Bank

    A financial institution licensed as a receiver of deposits. There ...
  6. Basel Committee On Bank Supervision

    A committee established by the central bank governors of the ...
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    What Is The Bank For International Settlements?

    Get the scoop on the structure and functions of the oldest global financial institution.
  2. Insights

    What Are Central Banks?

    They print money, they control inflation, and much, much more. All you need to know about central banks is here.
  3. Tech

    Can Bitcoin Kill Central Banks?

    Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer unofficial currency that operates without government or central bank oversight. Can Bitcoin kill off the need for central banks?
  4. Insights

    How Central Banks Control the Supply of Money

    A look at the ways central banks pump or drain money from the economy to keep it healthy.
  5. Investing

    Get To Know The Major Central Banks

    The policies of these banks affect the currency market like nothing else. See what makes them tick.
  6. Insights

    Should Central Banks Be Independent?

    Find out why more and more experts are calling for an end to central bank independence, any why such provocative calls may be just as dangerous.
  7. Investing

    What's a Correspondent Bank?

    A correspondent bank is a bank that acts on behalf of another bank, usually a foreign bank.
  8. Investing

    The Legacy of Basel I

    Basel I refers to a set of international banking rules enacted in 1988 by the Basel Committee on Bank Supervision.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How are international investment banking practices regulated?

    See which international organizations are responsible for overseeing and regulating global investment banks, including the ... Read Answer >>
  2. What does it mean to invest in money center banks?

    Invest in foreign and domestic banks when you invest in money center banks. You'll find these financial centers in many major ... Read Answer >>
  3. What developed countries have the highest concentration in the banking sector?

    Learn about the developed countries that have the greatest concentration in the banking sector and the most important emerging ... Read Answer >>
  4. What economic indicators are important to consider when investing in the banking ...

    Find out which economic indicators are most useful for investors in the banking sector, especially those influenced by central ... Read Answer >>
  5. Who determines interest rates?

    In countries using a centralized banking model, interest rates are determined by the central bank. In the first step of interest ... Read Answer >>
  6. How are bank reserve requirements determined and how does this affect shareholders?

    Learn how bank reserve requirements are determined and how bank reserves affect shareholders through improved bank stability ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Net Profit Margin

    Net Margin is the ratio of net profits to revenues for a company or business segment - typically expressed as a percentage ...
  2. Gross Margin

    A company's total sales revenue minus its cost of goods sold, divided by the total sales revenue, expressed as a percentage. ...
  3. Current Ratio

    The current ratio is a liquidity ratio measuring a company's ability to pay short-term and long-term obligations, also known ...
  4. SEC Form 13F

    A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), also known as the Information Required of Institutional Investment ...
  5. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
  6. Risk Averse

    A description of an investor who, when faced with two investments with a similar expected return (but different risks), will ...
Trading Center