DEFINITION of 'Bank For International Settlements - BIS'

An international organization fostering the cooperation of central banks and international monetary policy makers. Established in 1930, it is the oldest international financial organization, and was created to administer the transaction of monies according to the Treaty of Versailles. Among others, its main goals are to promote information sharing and to be a key center for economic research.

BREAKING DOWN 'Bank For International Settlements - BIS'

Essentially, the BIS is a central bank for central banks; it does not provide financial services to individuals or corporations. The BIS is located in Basel, Switzerland, and has representative offices in Mexico City and Hong Kong. Member banks include the Bank of Canada, the Federal Reserve Bank and the European Central Bank.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Central Bank

    The entity responsible for overseeing the monetary system for ...
  2. The World Bank

    An international organization dedicated to providing financing, ...
  3. International Reserves

    Any kind of reserve funds that can be passed between the central ...
  4. IRS Publication 901

    A document published by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) that ...
  5. IRS Publication 597

    A document published by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) that ...
  6. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European ...
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    What Is The Bank For International Settlements?

    Get the scoop on the structure and functions of the oldest global financial institution.
  2. Insights

    What Are Central Banks?

    They print money, they control inflation, and much, much more. All you need to know about central banks is here.
  3. Insights

    How Central Banks Control the Supply of Money

    A look at the ways central banks pump or drain money from the economy to keep it healthy.
  4. Trading

    Quantitative Easing

    Learn more about this monetary policy employed by central banks.
  5. Insights

    The World's Top 10 Banks

    Learn more about the world's largest banks and how more financial power shifts eastward as China is home to four of the world's largest banks.
  6. Insights

    How the Fed Profits From Quantitative Easing

    Central Banks including the U.S. Federal Reserve are making rich profits from stimulative measures such as Quantitative Easing (QE).
  7. Investing

    What's a Correspondent Bank?

    A correspondent bank is a bank that acts on behalf of another bank, usually a foreign bank.
  8. Investing

    The Legacy of Basel I

    Basel I refers to a set of international banking rules enacted in 1988 by the Basel Committee on Bank Supervision.
  9. Insights

    Understanding the Bank Rate

    Bank rate is a term describing the interest rate a country’s central bank charges its domestic banks on loans it makes to them.
  10. Investing

    Basel II Accord To Guard Against Financial Shocks

    Problems with the original accord became evident during the subprime crisis in 2007.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What developed countries have the highest concentration in the banking sector?

    Learn about the developed countries that have the greatest concentration in the banking sector and the most important emerging ... Read Answer >>
  2. What economic indicators are important to consider when investing in the banking ...

    Find out which economic indicators are most useful for investors in the banking sector, especially those influenced by central ... Read Answer >>
  3. What average annual growth rate is typical for the banking sector?

    Learn the typical average annual growth rate for the banking sector and why regulatory requirements have a profound effect ... Read Answer >>
  4. How are bank reserve requirements determined and how does this affect shareholders?

    Learn how bank reserve requirements are determined and how bank reserves affect shareholders through improved bank stability ... Read Answer >>
  5. How do central banks acquire currency reserves and how much are they required to ...

    A currency reserve is a currency that is held in large amounts by governments and other institutions as part of their foreign ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Backward Integration

    A form of vertical integration that involves the purchase of suppliers. Companies will pursue backward integration when it ...
  2. Pari-passu

    A Latin phrase meaning "equal footing" that describes situations where two or more assets, securities, creditors or obligations ...
  3. Interest Rate Swap

    An agreement between two parties (known as counterparties) where one stream of future interest payments is exchanged for ...
  4. Custodian

    A financial institution that holds customers' securities for safekeeping so as to minimize the risk of their theft or loss. ...
  5. Supply Chain

    The network created amongst different companies producing, handling and/or distributing a specific product. Specifically, ...
  6. In The Money

    1. For a call option, when the option's strike price is below the market price of the underlying asset. 2. For a put option, ...
Trading Center