Black Money

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DEFINITION of 'Black Money'

Proceeds, usually received in cash, from underground economic activity. Black money is earned through illegal activity and, as such, is not taxed. Recipients of black money must hide it, spend it only in the underground economy, or attempt to give it the appearance of legitimacy through illegal money laundering.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Black Money'

Possible sources of black money include drug trafficking, weapons trading, terrorism, prostitution, selling counterfeit or stolen goods and selling pirated versions of copyrighted items such as software and musical recordings. Black Money is also the name of a television series hosted by Lowell Bergman that explores the secret world of bribery in international business.

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