Blackout Period

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Blackout Period'

1. A term that refers to a temporary period in which access is limited or denied.

2. A period of around 60 days during which employees of a company with a retirement or investment plan cannot modify their plans. Notice must be given to employees in advance of a pending blackout.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Blackout Period'

1. This term is often in regards to contracts, policies and business activities. For example, when a political party is unable to advertise for a set amount of time before an election.

2. In a firm, a blackout period may happen because a plan is being restructured or altered, for example, if a pension fund is shifting from one fund manager to another at a different bank.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Peak Pricing

    A form of congestion pricing where customers pay an additional ...
  2. Cafeteria Plan

    An employee benefit plan that allows staff to choose from a variety ...
  3. 401(k) Plan

    A qualified plan established by employers to which eligible employees ...
  4. Pension Plan

    A type of retirement plan, usually tax exempt, wherein an employer ...
  5. Defined-Benefit Plan

    An employer-sponsored retirement plan where employee benefits ...
  6. Defined-Contribution Plan

    A retirement plan in which a certain amount or percentage of ...
Related Articles
  1. What is a blackout period?
    Retirement

    What is a blackout period?

  2. Retirement Planning Basics
    Options & Futures

    Retirement Planning Basics

  3. 5 Ways To Stretch Your Retirement Budget
    Budgeting

    5 Ways To Stretch Your Retirement Budget

  4. It's Never Too Early To Start Saving
    Savings

    It's Never Too Early To Start Saving

comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Harvest Strategy

    A strategy in which investment in a particular line of business is reduced or eliminated because the revenue brought in by ...
  2. Stop-Limit Order

    An order placed with a broker that combines the features of stop order with those of a limit order. A stop-limit order will ...
  3. Pareto Principle

    A principle, named after economist Vilfredo Pareto, that specifies an unequal relationship between inputs and outputs. The ...
  4. Pareto Principle

    A principle, named after economist Vilfredo Pareto, that specifies an unequal relationship between inputs and outputs. The ...
  5. Budget Deficit

    A status of financial health in which expenditures exceed revenue. The term "budget deficit" is most commonly used to refer ...
  6. Floating Exchange Rate

    A country's exchange rate regime where its currency is set by the foreign-exchange market through supply and demand for that ...
Trading Center