Bleeding Edge Technology

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Bleeding Edge Technology'

Technology that is acquired almost immediately after its release, regardless of the increased cost or risk involved. Bleeding edge technology is most popular among innovators and early adopters, and is often seen as related to terms "leading edge" and "cutting edge." However, bleeding edge technology suggests that a greater degree of risk is involved for the consumer who adopts it. This risk could be from limited support, uncaught problems, compatability issues and so on.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bleeding Edge Technology'

An example of bleeding edge technology would be the new smartphones that people take the day off from work to stand in line-ups for. After purchase, there may be fewer applications, major problems and limited support. Apple's iPhone 4 was bleeding edge technology for many users, and it came with some risks that included an antenna issue and some operating system glitches. These issues are usually addressed within months of the release of bleeding edge technology.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Absolute Advantage

    The ability of a country, individual, company or region to produce ...
  2. Cloud Computing

    A model for delivering information technology services in which ...
  3. Visual Basic For Applications - ...

    A computer programming language developed by Microsoft which ...
  4. Certified Data Processor - CDP

    An information technology (IT) certification. The certificate ...
  5. Comparative Advantage

    The ability of a firm or individual to produce goods and/or services ...
  6. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do name-brand products compete with their generic competitors?

    On April 2, 1993, Phillip Morris announced that it was cutting the price of its cigarettes to compete with the growing number ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does the market share of a few companies affect the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index ...

    In economics and commercial law, the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI) is a widely used measure that indicates the amount ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do I set up a Limited Liability Company (LLC)?

    The specific process and procedures for organizing a limited liability company (LLC) vary from state to state. However, the ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why does Warren Buffett largely avoid investing in the technology sector?

    Warren Buffett has often said that he avoids investing in the technology sector because he does not like to own stocks in ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does the rule of 70 indicate about a country's future economic growth?

    The rule of 70 could be used to indicate the approximate number of years that it would take a company's economic growth to ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How is the rule of 70 related to the growth rate of a variable?

    The rule of 70 is related to the growth rate of a variable because it uses the growth rate in its approximation of the number ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Professionals

    Advertising, Crocodiles And Moats

    Memorable advertising is a brick in the fortress that keeps competitors at bay.
  2. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Technology Sector Funds

    Evaluate past performance before investing in these types of gadget funds, as technology investors have been on a wild ride for a few years.
  3. Investing

    Clean Or Green Technology Investing

    Innovations in energy and consumption grow as companies adopt them to reduce costs.
  4. Personal Finance

    Mutual Funds: Brand Names Vs. House Brands

    Find out whether an in-house fund will serve you better than a major company's fund offerings.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    The History Of Information Machines

    Discover how technology changed the way we exchange information when trading.
  6. Investing

    3 Secrets Of Successful Companies

    Make smart investments by spotting up-and-coming success stories early.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Future Value

    Future value is the value of an asset or cash at a specified date in the future that is equivalent in value to a specified sum today.
  8. Economics

    What is Deadweight Loss?

    Mainly used in economics, deadweight loss can be applied to any deficiency caused by an inefficient allocation of resources.
  9. Investing

    The Strong Dollar’s (Real) Toll On Tech Stocks

    A large portion of U.S. technology companies’ sales occur overseas, given the strong international business and consumer demand from many U.S. tech firms.
  10. Economics

    How to Do a Cost-Benefit Analysis

    The benefits of a given situation or business-related action are summed and then the costs associated with taking that action are subtracted.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Covered Call

    An options strategy whereby an investor holds a long position in an asset and writes (sells) call options on that same asset ...
  2. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  3. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  4. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  5. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  6. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
Trading Center