Blended Rate

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DEFINITION of 'Blended Rate'

1. An interest rate charged on a loan, which is in between a previous rate and the new rate. Blended rates are usually offered through the refinancing of previous loans, and charge a rate that is higher than the old loan's rate but lower than the rate on a new loan.

2. A rate that is calculated for accounting purposes to better understand the debt obligation for several loans with different rates or the revenue from streams of interest income. The blended rate is used to calculate the pooled cost of funds.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Blended Rate'

1. Banks use a blended rate to retain customers and increase loan amounts to proven, creditworthy clients. For example, if a customer currently holds a 7% interest, $75,000 mortgage and wishes to refinance, and the current rate is 9%, the bank might offer a blended rate of 8%. The borrower could then decide to refinance for $145,000 with a blended rate of 8%. He or she would still pay 7% on the initial $75,000, but only 8% on the additional $70,000.

2. The blended rate is used in cost-of-funds accounting to quantify liabilities or investment income on a balance sheet. For example, if a company had two loans, one for $1,000 at 5% and the other for $3,000 at 6% and paid the interest off every month, the $1,000 loan would charge $50 after one year and the $3,000 loan would charge $180. The blended rate would therefore be (50+180)/4000 or 5.75%

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