Blend Fund

DEFINITION of 'Blend Fund'

A category of equity mutual funds with portfolios that are made up of a mix of value and growth stocks.

This is also referred to as a "hybrid fund".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Blend Fund'

A blend mutual fund has its origins in the graphical representation of a fund's essential characteristics in an equity style box, which was created and popularized by the investment research firm, Morningstar, Inc.

A style box for stocks contains nine squares. The vertical axis is divided into three categories, which represent company size - large, medium, and small - as determined by a fund's market capitalization. The horizontal axis is also divided into three categories based on the stocks in a fund's stock portfolio: value, value/growth blend and growth stocks.

As such, there are three versions of a stock blend fund, which would be differentiated simply by company size.

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