Blind Entry


DEFINITION of 'Blind Entry'

An accounting entry found in financial bookkeeping that is made without giving any explanatory description of the transaction that precipitated the entry. Blind entries do contain the necessary basic information required to keep accounting records correct and up-to-date, as they specify the currency value of the entry and whether it is a debit or a credit.


Blind entries can be appropriate in certain situations, such as with a business that sells only one product or service, where there is not much practical need to differentiate incoming sales between various customers. However, if used in any other context, blind entries should be investigated further.

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