Blockholder

What is a 'Blockholder'

A blockholder is the owner of a large amount of a company's shares and/or bonds, or block. In terms of shares, these owners are often able to influence the company with the voting rights awarded with their holding.

BREAKING DOWN 'Blockholder'

For example, if a mutual fund held 10 million shares in a company or 10% of the shares outstanding, they would be a blockholder and have considerable influence over who is on the board of directors.

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