Block Trade

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DEFINITION of 'Block Trade'

An order or trade submitted for sale or purchase of a large quantity of securities. A block trade involves a significantly large number of shares or bonds being traded at an arranged price between parties, outside of the open markets, in order to lessen the impact of such a large trade hitting the tape.


Also known as "Block Order."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Block Trade'

In general, 10,000 shares of stock (not including penny stocks) or $200,000 worth of bonds would be considered a block trade. However, in practice block trades are typically much larger as large hedge funds and institutional investors buy and sell huge sums of dollars and shares in block trades via investment banks and other intermediaries virtually on a daily basis.

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