Blow-Off Top

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DEFINITION of 'Blow-Off Top'

A chart pattern that indicates a steep and rapid increase in a security's price and trading volume followed by a steep and rapid drop in price and volume. The rapid changes indicated by a blow-off top, also called a blow-off move or exhaustion move, can be the result of actual news or pure speculation.


Blow-Off Top



INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Blow-Off Top'

A blow-off top usually indicates that a security's price is about to fall, while a blow-off bottom usually indicates that a security's price is about to rise. A security can enter a blow-off period during which its value remains inflated for weeks or months. Day traders who want to try to profit from blow-off periods, while limiting their losses from the price drops that inevitably follow a blow-off top, can use trailing stop techniques. Day traders also use blow-off tops to identify potential gap-n-go trades.

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