Blue Sheets

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Blue Sheets'

Requests for information sent out by the Securities and Exchange Commission to market makers, brokers and/or clearinghouses. Blue sheets ask for information related to specific securities or transactions and are often requested in order to determine if there has been any illegal activity or to determine why, for example, a certain security experienced a large level of volatility.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Blue Sheets'

Blue sheets provide the SEC with detailed information about trades performed by a firm and its clients. The information includes the security's name, the date traded, price, transaction size and a list of the parties involved.

The questionnaires came to be known as blue sheets because they were printed on blue paper. Today, due to the high volumes of trades, this information is provided electronically though electronic blue sheet systems or EBS.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Electronic Blue Sheet - EBS

    An electronic request for detailed information about trades sent ...
  2. Yellow Sheets

    A United States bulletin that provides updated bid and ask prices ...
  3. Pink Sheets

    A daily publication compiled by the National Quotation Bureau ...
  4. Securities And Exchange Commission ...

    A government commission created by Congress to regulate the securities ...
  5. Market Maker

    A broker-dealer firm that accepts the risk of holding a certain ...
  6. New York Stock Exchange - NYSE

    A stock exchange based in New York City, which is considered ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What's the difference between insider trading and insider information?

    Insider information is the knowledge of nonpublic material about a publicly traded company that may affect the stock's price. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What licenses and certifications do you need for a career in portfolio management?

    Traditionally, a career in portfolio management requires a certain level of education, professional licensing, on-the-job ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why does financial accounting have to comply with GAAP?

    Not all financial accounting practices in the United States have to comply with generally accepted accounting principles ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is required to become an accredited investor in a private placement?

    The term "accredited investors" is defined by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) as individuals with a net ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How is buying on margin regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)?

    The Federal Reserve Board and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) regulate buying on margin to a greater ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How did the stock market operate prior to the Securities and Exchange Commission?

    The first American stock markets were established in Philadelphia in 1790 and New York in 1792. Trading was largely dominated ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Stock Basics Tutorial

    If you're new to the stock market and want the basics, this is the tutorial for you!
  2. Investing Basics

    Principal Trading and Agency Trading

    Ever wonder what happens behind the scenes when you buy or sell a stock? Read on and find out!
  3. Economics

    The SEC: A Brief History Of Regulation

    The SEC has continued to make the market a safer place and to learn from and adapt to new scandals and crises.
  4. Markets

    Speed Read SEC Filings For Hot Stock Picks

    SEC forms can be a real headache. Find out how to make your research more efficient - and more effective.
  5. Investing Basics

    Policing The Securities Market: An Overview Of The SEC

    Find out how this regulatory body protects the rights of investors.
  6. Options & Futures

    SEC-Regulated Options Brokers

    Investopedia provides a List Of SEC-Regulated Options Brokers
  7. Investing

    REITs 101: How They're Regulated

    Here's everything you need to know about REITs in less than five minutes.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    How To Start a Hedge Fund In the United States

    A general overview of how to start a hedge fund firm in the United States, including complying with state and federal regulations.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    How To Start A Hedge Fund In The UK

    Starting a new hedge fund in the United Kingdom is more complex than in the United States. We discuss UK laws and regulations for starting a new hedge fund.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    How To Start A Hedge Fund In Canada

    Would-be hedge fund managers in Canada need to understand the laws and regulations that must be followed in order to start a fund in the country.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fisher Effect

    An economic theory proposed by economist Irving Fisher that describes the relationship between inflation and both real and ...
  2. Fiduciary

    1. A person legally appointed and authorized to hold assets in trust for another person. The fiduciary manages the assets ...
  3. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  4. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  5. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  6. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
Trading Center