Boardroom

DEFINITION of 'Boardroom'

Besides the general definition as a meeting room in an office, in the investment community the boardroom can refer more specifically to a room used in a stockbrokerage office. The boardroom is where clients and members of the public can meet with registered representatives. They meet here to discuss investments, obtain stock quotes and place trades.

BREAKING DOWN 'Boardroom'

Board rooms usually have the latest techological equipment, such as Bloomberg terminals or other state-of-the-art quotation systems. The boardrooms at larger firms often also have large-screen TVs and other multimedia sources of business news. Some firms do not use these rooms at all, but allow clients to meet with brokers in their individual offices.

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