Bogey

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DEFINITION of 'Bogey'

A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the investment scope of the funds investment. Comparing a fund's performance to a benchmark index gives investors an idea of how well the fund is doing compared to the market.

Also known referred to as "bogy".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bogey'

For example, the performance of a small-cap fund may be compared to the Russell 2000, which is a benchmark for small-cap funds. The Russell 2000 would be referred to as the small-caps bogey, when talking of its over- or underperformance to the fund.

One of the most common benchmarks is the S&P 500 index.

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