DEFINITION of 'Bond Circular'

A standardized legal document that contains an abbreviated version of the relevant terms from the prospectus of a new bond issue. The bond circular is made available to prospective investors and contains basic information including: issuer, amount of the issue, coupon, use of proceeds and final legal maturity of the bond.

Also known as an "offering circular".

BREAKING DOWN 'Bond Circular'

All securities and mutual funds made available for sale in the U.S. must have an offering circular per the Securities Act of 1933. It is usually delivered electronically along with the prospectus to potential investors. In addition to the basic information described above, the bond circular describes whether debt is senior or subordinated and how the company plans to use the issue proceeds.

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