Bond Covenant

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Bond Covenant'

A legally binding term of an agreement between a bond issuer and a bond holder. Bond covenants are designed to protect the interests of both parties. Negative or restrictive covenants forbid the issuer from undertaking certain activities; positive or affirmative covenants require the issuer to meet specific requirements.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bond Covenant'

Possible bond covenants might include restrictions on the issuer's ability to take on additional debt, requirements that the issuer provide audited financial statements to bond holders and limitations on the issuer's ability to make new capital investments. When an issuer violates a bond covenant, it is considered to be in technical default. A common penalty for violating a bond covenant is the downgrading of a bond's rating, which could make it less attractive to investors and increase the issuer's borrowing costs.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Bond Purchase Agreement

    A legally binding document between a bond issuer and an underwriter ...
  2. Bond Violation

    A breach of the terms of a surety agreement. A bond violation ...
  3. Dim Sum Bond

    A bond denominated in Chinese yuan and issued in Hong Kong. Dim ...
  4. Convertible Bond

    A bond that can be converted into a predetermined amount of the ...
  5. Bond

    A debt investment in which an investor loans money to an entity ...
  6. Corporate Bond

    A debt security issued by a corporation and sold to investors. ...
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Junk Bonds: Everything You Need To Know

    Don't be fooled by the name - junk bonds may be for you if you know how to analyze them.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Basics Of Federal Bond Issues

    Treasuries are considered the safest investments, but they should still be analyzed when issued.
  3. Investing

    The Advantages Of Bonds

    Bonds contribute an element of stability to almost any portfolio and offer a safe and conservative investment.
  4. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Corporate Bonds: An Introduction To Credit Risk

    Corporate bonds offer higher yields, but it's important to evaluate the extra risk involved before you buy.
  5. Personal Finance

    When To Trust Bond Rating Agencies

    Despite investor distrust, rating agencies can be helpful. Just be sure you use these ratings as a starting point.
  6. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Convertible Bonds: Pros And Cons For Companies And Investors

    Find out why businesses choose this type of financing and what effect this has on investors.
  7. Home & Auto

    The Bear On Bonds

    Bond investing is a stable and low-risk way to diversify a portfolio. However, knowing which types of bonds are right for you is not always easy.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    PIMCO vs. BlackRock: Weighing Mega Fund Managers

    A look at the world's biggest bond manager and the world's largest asset manager.
  9. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Why Didn't Quantitative Easing Lead To Hyperinflation?

    Hyperinflation is an exponential rise in prices and tends to occur not when countries print too much money, but is instead associated with a collapse in the real underlying economy.
  10. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Figuring Out How To Cover Your Liability Bases

    Whenever we talk about the asset-liability approach to portfolio management (ALM), the concepts of immunization and cash flow matching come into play.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fixed-Charge Coverage Ratio

    A ratio that indicates a firm's ability to satisfy fixed financing expenses, such as interest and leases. It is calculated ...
  2. Efficiency Ratio

    Ratios that are typically used to analyze how well a company uses its assets and liabilities internally. Efficiency Ratios ...
  3. Fixed Cost

    A cost that does not change with an increase or decrease in the amount of goods or services produced. Fixed costs are expenses ...
  4. Subsidy

    A benefit given by the government to groups or individuals usually in the form of a cash payment or tax reduction. The subsidy ...
  5. Sunk Cost

    A cost that has already been incurred and thus cannot be recovered. A sunk cost differs from other, future costs that a business ...
  6. Technical Skills

    1. The knowledge and abilities needed to accomplish mathematical, engineering, scientific or computer-related duties, as ...
Trading Center