Bond Crowd

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DEFINITION of 'Bond Crowd'

A slang term used to describe members of the stock exchange that transact bond orders from the floor of the exchange. The label "bond crowd" differentiates them from the members of the exchange who trade stocks.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bond Crowd'

The bond crowd traditionally stood within the bond booth of the New York Stock Exchange to buy and sell bonds. The term "bond crowd" refers to the physical separation of the bond brokers and dealers from the stock traders that first occurred in 1902. Until then, stock and bond traders were on the same floor.

The "active bond crowd" is a subset of the bond crowd and refers to the most active members in terms of volume traded.

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