Bond Discount

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Bond Discount'

The amount by which the market price of a bond is lower than its principal amount due at maturity. This amount, called its par value, is often $1,000. As bond prices are quoted as a percent of face value, a price of 98.00 means that the bond is selling for 98% of its face value of $1,000.00 and the bond discount is 2%.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bond Discount'

Bonds trade at a discount to par value for a number of reasons. Bonds on the secondary market with fixed coupons will trade at discounts when market interest rates rise. While the investor receives the same coupon, the bond is discounted to match prevailing market yields. Discounts also occur when bond supply exceeds demand, when the bond's credit rating is lowered, or when the perceived risk of default increases. Conversely, falling interest rates or an improved credit rating may cause a bond to trade at a premium.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Par Value

    The face value of a bond. Par value for a share refers to the ...
  2. Effective Interest Method

    The practice of accounting for the discount at which a bond is ...
  3. Net Interest Cost (NIC)

    A mathematical formula that an issuer of bonds uses to compute ...
  4. Bond Rating

    A grade given to bonds that indicates their credit quality. Private ...
  5. Discount

    The condition of the price of a bond that is lower than par. ...
  6. Coupon

    The interest rate stated on a bond when it's issued. The coupon ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Are high-yield bonds better investments than low-yield bonds?

    Most bonds typically make periodic payments, known as coupon payments, to the bondholder. A bond's indenture, which will ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What does it mean when a bond is selling at a premium? Is it a good investment?

    When the terms premium and discount are used in reference to bonds, they are telling investors that the purchase price of ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. If the price of the bond falls, does that mean the company won't pay me the par value?

    When you buy a bond, you are loaning money to the issuer. Because a bond is a loan, the interest paid to the bondholder is ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Junk Bonds: Everything You Need To Know

    Don't be fooled by the name - junk bonds may be for you if you know how to analyze them.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Understanding Bond Prices and Yields

    Understanding this relationship can help an investor in any market.
  3. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Climb The Bond Ladder To Higher Income

    Whether it's learning how to ladder bonds or finding alternatives, investors seeking better returns need to be more active.
  4. Bonds & Fixed Income

    How Bond Market Pricing Works

    Learn the basic rules that govern how bond prices are determined.
  5. Credit & Loans

    Understanding Credit Risk

    Credit risk arises whenever a borrower is expecting to use future cash flows to pay a current debt.
  6. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Should Junk Bond ETFs Be a Part of Your Portfolio?

    Should junk bonds be a part of your portfolio? Here's what you need to know.
  7. Professionals

    Vanguard Readies Muni Bond ETF

    Vanguard is set to roll out a muni bond ETF, the firm's first.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Is the TLT ETF a Good Bet for the Long Run?

    Is the iShares 20+ Year Treasury Bond ETF (TLT) a good bet for the long run?
  9. Bonds & Fixed Income

    African Equities vs. Bonds: Risks and Rewards

    A look at the risks and rewards of exposure to African equities vs. bonds.
  10. Credit & Loans

    What are the Five C's of Credit?

    The five C’s of credit are what banks and other lenders evaluate about a potential borrower when making a lending decision. The five C’s are Character, Capacity, Capital, Collateral and Conditions. ...

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Interest Rate Risk

    The risk that an investment's value will change due to a change in the absolute level of interest rates, in the spread between ...
  2. Income Effect

    In the context of economic theory, the income effect is the change in an individual's or economy's income and how that change ...
  3. Price-To-Sales Ratio - PSR

    A valuation ratio that compares a company’s stock price to its revenues. The price-to-sales ratio is an indicator of the ...
  4. Hurdle Rate

    The minimum rate of return on a project or investment required by a manager or investor. In order to compensate for risk, ...
  5. Market Value

    The price an asset would fetch in the marketplace. Market value is also commonly used to refer to the market capitalization ...
  6. Preference Shares

    Company stock with dividends that are paid to shareholders before common stock dividends are paid out. In the event of a ...
Trading Center