Bond Violation

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Bond Violation'

A breach of the terms of a surety agreement. A bond violation occurs when a surety bond, which protects one party against a financial loss caused by the other party's failure to perform, fails to meet the conditions of the agreement. For example, the owner of a shopping center who hires a contractor to perform a seismic retrofit of the building might require the contractor to purchase a surety bond. If the contractor's work fails to bring the building into compliance with current earthquake construction codes as stipulated in the surety bond, the contractor has failed to perform and thus committed a bond violation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Bond Violation'

In the event of the bond violation in this example, the surety company would pay the shopping center owner for this loss and the surety company would then collect that sum from the contractor. The surety bond guarantees that the shopping center owner gets his or her money even if the contractor can't pay. The surety arrangement reduces the shopping center owner's risk and makes him or her more willing to hire the contractor.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Continuous Bond

    A financial guarantee commonly used in international trade that ...
  2. Bond Purchase Agreement

    A legally binding document between a bond issuer and an underwriter ...
  3. Dim Sum Bond

    A bond denominated in Chinese yuan and issued in Hong Kong. Dim ...
  4. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with ...
  5. Bond

    A debt investment in which an investor loans money to an entity ...
  6. Corporate Bond

    A debt security issued by a corporation and sold to investors. ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    What Are The Latest News On The Beer Industry?

    Beer isn’t a traditional commodity, as there are no futures markets associated with it, but it is considered an alternative investment.
  2. Investing

    Reassessing Your Approach To Bond Investing

    Rethinking your fixed-income portfolio may not resonate in quite the same way as dropping 10 pounds or finally giving up that smoking habit.
  3. Markets

    What Is The Current Market Supply For Oil?

    Oil prices skidded by more than 10 %, sparking a sell-off in U.S. equities of 3.5 %, a Treasury rally and global headlines of growth fears and tumult.
  4. Active Trading Fundamentals

    Minute-to-Minute Trade Signals for Today's Scalper

    Scalpers profit in the modern electronic environment by utilizing technical indicators that are custom-tuned to very small time frames.
  5. Credit & Loans

    Credit Card Review: The Amazon.com Rewards Visa

    The rewards from
  6. Chart Advisor

    These 4 Stocks are Hitting Technical Headwinds

    These up trending stocks are showing signs of weakness, indicating it may be time to sell.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    What is the affect of the invisible hand on consumers?

    Discover how consumers help initiate and benefit from the invisible hand of the market, which naturally coordinates trade in an exchange economy.
  8. Trading Strategies

    How does short selling help the market and investors?

    Find out how short sellers provide a service to the market by acting as a check against overvalued companies and exposing unethical practices.
  9. Credit & Loans

    What is the difference between APR and APY?

    Learn about the difference between the calculations for APR and APY. APY takes into account the number of times that the interest rate is applied on an amount.
  10. Economics

    How does the invisible hand phenomenon affect investment markets?

    Read about how the invisible hand of the market coordinates investment markets and provides social benefit and why its effects are distorted along the way.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest ...
  2. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  3. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  4. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  5. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
  6. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds maintained at the Federal Reserve to another depository institution ...
Trading Center